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Ashes to ashes

I collected Darwin the foster coonhound's ashes today (for some reason it took ages for them to come back). They are in a terribly posh sealed wooden box with his name on the top.  I was expecting a bag in a pot at most, that's what I got last time we had a pet cremated at that vet.    It seems a bit of a major environmental footprint for the  end of a saggy old dog. 

I'm not a big one for keeping remains forever: I don't do graves, and usually don't even ask for the ashes back: I'm not quite sure why I did this time.  I was just planning to take them on one of his favorite walks and let the wind take the ashes, but this thing is a great solid awkward lump (rather appropriate really, Darwin was something of a solid awkward lump too ). Now I don't know what to do. Maybe I'll take a spade and bury it instead.

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( 4 comments — Leave a comment )
ningloreth
20th Jan, 2012 21:17 (UTC)
I think burying them is a good idea. My family insisted on scattering my mother's ashes in a very public place and -- I know this doesn't really apply to a dog -- but I couldn't help feeling that my mother would have been mortified by the exposure. A private little spot in the garden seems much nicer to me.
inzilbeth_liz
20th Jan, 2012 22:27 (UTC)
Yes, I would bury them but then I've buried all my dogs. I do worry that they'll be dug up one day though.
lil_shepherd
21st Jan, 2012 09:09 (UTC)
He plainly made a real impression on you in the short time he was with you.
endlessrarities
1st Feb, 2012 21:06 (UTC)
I've still got the ashes of one horse and four cats hanging around - one day, I hope to settle somewhere with a big enough garden to build a cairn to them all. Squire is currently residing in a 5l tupperware style carton with a dried flower stuck on the top...
( 4 comments — Leave a comment )

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